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Friday, June 11, 1999

Supermarkets to refund customers for EU products

PETALING JAYA: Supermarkets which are members of the Malaysian Retailers Association will refund customers who bought EU products before the ban was announced.

Its chairman for the supermarkets and hypermarkets committee Noryahwati Mohd Noh said yesterday many retailers had offered to give refunds for these products.

The association has 96 members.

A spokesman for Carrefour Malaysia Stores said customers could get refunds at its customer information counters in all its five outlets.

"The customers can bring the product to the counters together with the original receipt. We will then refund them," she said.

On Monday, Health Minister Datuk Chua Jui Meng announced a temporary ban on all EU products because of the dioxin scare.

All EU products now required a certificate to prove these were dioxin-free before they could be sold locally.

A customer service spokesman with Giant Hypermarket, Subang Jaya, said customers could exchange the products they bought with a cash voucher of similar value at its counters.

"The customers can use the voucher anytime.

"And if they do not have the original receipt, they can still get their refunds as our computers can scan the barcode to determine whether the products are bought at any of our seven outlets," she said.

A Makro Cash and Carry Distribution (M) Sdn Bhd spokesman said all EU products could be refunded at its seven outlets provided these were returned within a week and the packages were not unwrapped.

"They must also be accompanied by an original receipt," he said.

In Shah Alam, Malaysian Paediatric Association committee member Dr Hoe Tuck Sang said parents should check the date on their infant formula before discarding them.

"If the milk powder was manufactured before Jan 1, it should be safe to use.

"If it's after, check if the manufacturing country is in Europe, Australia or elsewhere," he said when commenting on parents who had rushed out to buy other brands of milk powder.

However, he advised parents to consult their paediatricians if the babies were on special milk formulae, had previous problem with milk or suffered from any form of allergy.

Paediatrician Dr Ling Shiang Yih from a private hospital here had been besieged with calls from distressed mothers wanting advice after their babies' milk formula had been withdrawn.

"All the commercial infant formula has similar content because they were made to be as close to breastmilk as possible. The little difference is in the taste."

Dr Ling said with all the scare over infant formula, mothers should try breastfeeding, as it was best for babies and safe from the dangers of dioxin.





Copyright © 1999. Star Publications (Malaysia) Bhd. (Co No. 10894-D)
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